21 October 2012

Happy birthday, Dizzy!


The trumpet pioneer of bop, Dizzy was one of a small group of people who defined an entire generation of music. That style featured his furious playing, alternating between infectiously simple and complex high speed phrases.

He began studying the playing of Roy Eldridge. In 1937 he moved to New York and became a session player. In 1940 he met Charlie Parker in Kansas City. They developed bebop playing in after-hours jam sessions with Kenny Clarke, Thelonious Monk and Max Roach.

His first bebop recording was in 1944 with Coleman Hawkins. A year later he recorded with Parker. Some of his famous compositions include 'Salt Peanuts', 'Woody 'N You' and 'Shaw Nuff'. [source]

Gillespie described be-bop as music with a different accent, " ... on the up beat. Instead of OO-bah, it's oo-BAH. Different chords too." [source]

They're not particular about whether you're playing a flatted fifth or a ruptured 129th as long as they can dance to it. [source]

John Birks "Dizzy" Gillespie was born on 21 October 1917. Happy birthday to him.

9 comments:

Paul said...

Dizzy and I were both born in South Carolina !!

Rethabile said...

Yep, Dizzy is the man.

Paul said...

The cat could play. I like Stan Getz too-smooth Jazz.

Stephen Bess said...

Love Dizzy. The closest I've come to Dizzy is when I met his daughter, Jeanie Bryson in Savannah, GA. She's a jazz singer with a beautiful voice.

gel said...

oh YES!
his jazz rocks

Dick said...

Bop is all too often represented by intellectual analysts as a jazz development that came pretty much from nowhere, eschewing the big band swing that preceded it & breaking with what some have perceived as the hokey origins of jazz, notably the blues. Gillespie's playing - like that of all of the brightest & the best - grew from the deepest roots.

Kai C. said...

happy birthday Dizzy!:)

Stephen Bess said...

Dumela, abuti. I have something for you on my blog.

Dick said...

Discovering DG and Charlie Parker via my ultra-hip French teacher was a life-changer. For years afterwards my contemporaranous convert Andy and I would greet each other with a chorus of 'salt peanuts'!